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Immigrant Visas
IVBogota@state.gov

Adoptions
Child Citizenship Act of 2000
Diversity Immigrant Visa Program
Documents needed
Domicile requirement
Evidence of economic support
FAQs
Fees
Fiancé/e visa (K-1)
Legal Immigration Family Equity Act
Marriage to a Colombian
Priority dates
New categories: K-3, K-4 and V
Returning residents
Sworn statement
V Visa
Visa Appointments
Visa Lottery
Visas for immediate relatives

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  Updated: 02/IX/04

Immigrant Visas

Versión en español

This document is intended for informational purposes only.
Requirements are subject to change without notice.


What is the process for filing a petition for a family member?

U.S. citizens resident in the U.S. must file Immigrant Visa petitions in the U.S. with the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services office having jurisdiction over their place of residence. All immigrant visa petitions for parents, brothers and sisters, and children over 21 years of age must be filed in the U.S. with the DHS. A U.S. citizen who is a legal resident of Colombia, and currently completed at least six months continuous presence in the country, may petition at the Embassy for the spouse, unmarried children (under the age of 21) and stepchildren.

Public Inquiries
Phone numbers for public inquiries are (603) 334-0700 for the National Visa Center and (202) 663-1225 for the Visa Office at the Department of State.


How to Prove the Relationship between Petitioner and Beneficiary

This section provides a guide for how to prove, documentarily, the family relationship between the petitioner and the beneficiary. Additional documents will be required.

Please note that, regardless of the visa category, all applicants must provide a notarized copy of their birth certificate (registro civil) if born after 1939. In addition, all applicants, regardless of their year of birth, must provide a baptismal certificate, if they were baptized. See information on additional documents required.

If you are classified as the brother/sister of a United States citizen (Family-Sponsored Fourth Preference, F-4), you must present your Baptismal Certificate (fe de bautismo) or the Civil Register (registro civil) as well as your brother's or sister's, in acceptable form. If you have the same father but different mothers, you must present your father's marriage certificates to each wife as well as proof of the termination of his previous marriage(s) [divorce certificate(s), annulment(s), and/or death certificate(s)]. If your last name or your brother's/sister's has changed due to a marriage or another reason, you must provide proof of that name change. For example, if your sister, Maria Gonzalez, married John Robinson and she now calls herself Maria Robinson, please provide her marriage certificate to John Robinson in order to prove that she is the same person.

If you are classified as the son/daughter of a United States citizen (IR-2/CR-2; Family-Sponsored First Preference, F-1; or Family-Sponsored Third Preference, F-3) or of a legal permanent resident of the United States (Family-Sponsored Second Preference, F-2) because your mother filed a petition on your behalf, you must present your birth certificate (registro civil) showing your mother's name, in acceptable form.

If you are classified because your father, stepfather or stepmother filed a petition on your behalf, you must present birth certificate (registro civil) as well as the marriage certificate of the petitioner with one of your parents and proof of termination of his/her previous marriage(s) [divorce certificate(s), annulment(s), or death certificate(s)]. )]. For example, if your father is petitioning for you, you will need to present your father's marriage certificate to your mother (if applicable). If your step-father is petitioning for you, you will need to present your mother's marriage certificate to your father (if applicable), proof of the termination of the marriage between your mother and father [divorce certificate(s), annulment(s), and/or death certificate(s), if applicable], proof of the termination of any marriage(s) of your step-father [divorce certificate(s), annulment(s), and/or death certificate(s)], and your mother's marriage certificate to your step-father. In addition, if your last name or your father's/mother's has changed due to a marriage or another reason, please provide proof of that name change. For example, if your mother, Maria Gonzalez, married John Robinson and she now calls herself Maria Robinson, please provide her marriage certificate to John Robinson in order to prove that she is the same person.

If you are classified as the mother of a United States citizen (IR-5) you must present the birth certificate (registro civil), in acceptable form, of the son/daughter who filed the petition on your behalf. Your name should be on the birth certificate. In addition, if your last name or your son's/daughter's has changed due to a marriage or another reason, please provide proof of that name change. For example, if your daughter, Maria Gonzalez, married John Robinson and she now calls herself Maria Robinson, please provide her marriage certificate to John Robinson in order to prove that she is the same person.

If you are classified as the father, stepfather or stepmother of a United States citizen, (IR-5) you must present the birth certificate (registro civil), in acceptable form, of your son/daughter who filed the petition on your behalf, as well as the marriage certificate to your son's/daughter's mother/father, if applicable. If you have been previously married, you must also present proof of the termination of the(se) marriage(s) [divorce(s), annulment(s) or death certificates(s)].

If you are classified as spouse of a United States citizen or of a legal permanent resident (IR-1/CR-1; Family-Sponsored Second Preference, F-2), you must present your (registro civil), in acceptable form, as well as the civil registry of your marriage (the church registry will not be accepted). If you and/or your spouse have been previously married, you should also present proof of the termination of such marriages [divorce(s), annulment(s) or death certificates(s)].

A civil or ecclesiastic separation (for example, separación de cuerpos)
is NOT proof of the termination of a marriage.
To prove the termination of a marriage we only accept
divorce certificates, annulments, or death certificates.
They must be original certificates or certified copies.


Required Documents

  1. PASSPORT. A passport must be valid for at least (6) six months from the date of visa issuance. The biographical information data contained in the passport must be in accordance with the information on the other documents presented on the day of the appointment. Any error in this information must have been corrected by the pertinent Colombian authorities in order for a visa to be issued. If you have traveled to the United States you should also present your previous passports.

  2. BIRTH/BAPTISMAL CERTIFICATE. A birth certificate (copy of the book where the birth was registered, copia del folio del registro civil) issued and certified by a notary, must be presented (except for people born before 1939). It must state the date and place of birth as well as the complete names of both parents. It must also indicate the day on which the birth was registered. The abbreviated forms are not acceptable; only the copia del folio del registro civil will be accepted..

    People born before 1939 only need to present a baptismal certificate (fe de bautismo) issued recently and containing the corresponding marginal notes. If you were not baptized or if your baptism occurred after you were a year old, you should present a Sworn Statement with the birth certificate.

    People born after 1939 must present their birth certificate (copia del folio del registro civil) as well as their baptismal certificate (fe de bautismo). The abbreviated forms are not acceptable; only the copia del folio del registro civil will be accepted. The baptismal certificate must contain the marginal notes. If one of these certificates existed but now is impossible to obtain for any reason, you must get a Sworn Affidavit from the church or a court, indicating the reasons why the document cannot be produced. If you do not have one of these documents, you must obtain a Sworn Statement.

    The Sworn Statement must be made by two persons (preferably family members) who have personal knowledge of the event you are trying to prove. Such statement must contain the following information:

    • names of the persons making the statement
    • addresses of the persons making the statement
    • name of the applicant
    • complete address of the applicant
    • date and place of birth of the applicant
    • relationship to the applicant
    • details concerning how the persons acquired knowledge of the event

  3. MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE. Married persons are required to present a certified copy of their marriage certificate. The certificate must state the date and place of the wedding, the complete names of the spouses, and the complete name and title of the person who performed the ceremony. It should also specify the day on which the marriage was registered. Ecclesiastical marriage certificates will not be accepted as proof of marriage; only the civil registry (registro civil) of the marriage can be accepted. If you and/or your spouse have been previously married, you must present proof of the termination of the marriage(s) [(death certificate(s), annulment(s), or divorce certificate(s)]. These documents must be originals or certified copies.

  4. POLICE CERTIFICATES. Police certificates must be presented for all the places where you have lived for a period of six months or more after the age of 18. The certificates must cover the entire period of the applicant's residence in the area. Police certificates from the United States, Costa Rica, Spain and Venezuela are not available and, therefore, are not required. All Colombian citizens over 18 years old must obtain a police certificate at the nearest DAS (Departamento Administrativo de Seguridad) office; even citizens over 70 years old must obtain this certificate.

  5. COURT AND PRISON RECORDS. If you have been detained or convicted of a crime, you must obtain one certified copy of each court record and of any prison record, regardless of whether or not you subsequently benefited from an amnesty, pardon or other act of clemency. If you have not been detained or convicted of a crime, such documentation is not required.

    If you have been deported or have been granted a voluntary departure from the United States, you must bring the relevant documents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) .

  6. EVIDENCE OF SUPPORT. Every applicant must present a notarized affidavit of support (Form I-864), completed by the petitioner, and corresponding proof of economic solvency. This proof includes the petitioner's last three years of U.S. income tax returns (Forms W-2 and 1040) as well as a recent letter from his/her employer stating how long he/she has had his/her job and how much money he/she earns annually. If the petitioner does not meet the minimum income requirements established by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, a cosponsor will be required. The cosponsor will also have to submit a notarized Affidavit of Support, his/her last three years of income tax returns, and his/her job letter. Residents of Puerto Rico need only to submit their Puerto Rican income tax returns; for all other U.S. residents, federal tax returns are the only acceptable documents (state income tax returns are not required). In addition, the Affidavit of Support MUST be notarized by a U.S. notary; notaries of foreign countries are not acceptable. The Immigrant Visa (IV) Unit can notarize Affidavits Monday through Thursday at 1:00PM, except on U.S. and/or Colombian holidays.

  7. PHOTOGRAPHS. Four (4) color photographs are required (bring two to the interview and two to the medical exam). They must be 5cm. by 5cm., with white background, unretouched and unmounted. The dimension of the facial image must measure about one inch (2.5 cms) from the chin to the top of the hair. No hair covering, earrings, or dark glasses should be worn. Photos are required of all applicants, regardless of age, and should be taken before the appointment date. No instant or digital photos are accepted.


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

Following Colombian law, in order for DAS to permit a minor under the age of 18 to travel outside of Colombia, he/she must have a letter signed by both parents giving permission to do so.


VISA ISSUANCE TIME FRAME

Petitions approved by DHS and sent to the National Visa Center (NVC) are scheduled for interview with a Consular Officer approximately one to two months after they are sent from the NVC. Those that are submitted by US citizens resident in Colombia are scheduled for interview with a Consular Officer approximately six months after they are accepted. These time frames are subject to change.


WAIVERS FROM DHS FOR INELIGIBILITIES

If an applicant is denied the immigrant visa based on an ineligibility for which a waiver is available, they applicant may come to the Embassy any working Monday through Thursday at 1:00PM for waiver information. Once complete, the waiver packet is sent to DHS in Panama for review. If the waiver is denied, the applicant has 30 days to submit an appeal in the United States.


Evidence of Economic Support



Beginning December 19, 1997, U.S. Immigration Law requires that all applications for immigrant visas in the categories listed below need to be accompanied by a contractually binding affidavit of support (Form I-864) which has been signed by the petitioner. Most applicants in the categories identified here must submit a properly notarized I-864 in order to qualify for a visa. Applicants must present completed forms at the time of visa interview. Beginning mid-July 2001, the contractually-binding Affidavit of Support is waived for children adopted abroad, since they may become citizens upon entering the United States with an immigrant visa.

Do not mail forms to a consular section, the National Visa Center, nor the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), unless specifically instructed to do so.

The National Visa Center will include the I-864 with routine information packets. Petitioners and other inquirers may obtain additional information and copies of the I-864 through:

The Bureau of Consular Affairs:
http://travel.state.gov/visa_services.html

or through the Department of Homeland Security website (DHS) or local office.


Purpose of the form: Form I-864 is required to assist Consular Officers in determining whether an immigrant visa applicant will have adequate means of financial support in the United States and will not become a public charge. By executing this form, the petitioner agrees to reimburse any government agency and/or private entity that provides the sponsored alien with any means-tested public benefits.

Who needs an affidavit of support under INA Section 213A?
Family-based immigrants and those employment-based immigrants who are petitioned by a relative or by a business in which a relative has significant ownership interest need to present an Affidavit of Support. Self-petitioning widow(er)s and battered spouses and children and adoptees adopted abroad after mid-July 2001 are exempt from this requirement.

Who completes an affidavit of support under INA Section 213A?
The person completing the affidavit is the sponsor or co-sponsor (co-fiador). For family-based immigrants, the petitioner must be the sponsor. (If a step-parent is petitioning for a step-child, Form I-864 must be in the name of the step-parent; the natural parent may file a Form I-864A, "Contract between Household Member and Sponsor," in support of the step-parent's Form I-864). For employment-based immigrants, the petitioning relative or relative with significant ownership interest in the petitioning entity must be the sponsor.

If the petitioner/sponsor does not make sufficient money under the minimum income requirements established by the Department of Health and Human Services, a co-sponsor may be used. A co-sponsor may be any U.S. citizen or Legal Permanent Resident who is domiciled in the United States. The co-sponsor does not need to be a relative of the petitioner/sponsor, though he/she may be.

A Form I-864 with all supporting documents must be submitted for each visa applicant, including eligible accompanying family members. For immediate relatives of U.S. citizens in the IR or CR category, a separate, original Affidavit of Support is required for each applicant. If a co-sponsor is required, each individual immediate relative may have a separate co-sponsor, or, if the co-sponsor makes sufficient money to sponsor each member of the family, the same co-sponsor. However, the co-sponsor must complete a separate, original Affidavit of Support for each member of the family. For other relatives of U.S. citizens and/or Legal Permanent Residents in the Family Preference categories (F-1, F-2, F-3, and F-4), one Affidavit of Support may be used for all the applicants in the case. However, one original Affidavit of Support must be submitted, and the names of the other members in the case must be listed on that Affidavit. If a co-sponsor is required, the co-sponsor must make sufficient money to sponsor all members of the family; each individual member of the case cannot have a different co-sponsor.

If a petitioner/sponsor and/or co-sponsor needs to include a household member's income in order to meet the minimum income requirements, the sponsor and the household member will need to complete Form I-864A ("Contract between Sponsor and Household Member"). If the spouse does not have an income, this form is not required.

The Affidavit of Support must be notarized by a U.S. notary; notaries of foreign countries are not acceptable. The Immigrant Visa (IV) Unit can notarize Affidavits Monday through Thursday at 1:00PM except on U.S. and/or Colombian holidays.

What are the supporting documents?
Each petitioner/sponsor, co-sponsor, and/or household member (if he/she files income tax returns separate from his/her spouse) must submit his/her last three years of income tax returns (Forms W-2 and 1040) as well a recent letter from his/her employer stating how long he/she has had his/her job and how much he/she makes annually. Residents of Puerto Rico need only submit their Puerto Rican income tax returns; for all other U.S. residents, federal tax returns are the only acceptable documents (state income tax returns are not required).

Validity of the I-864 and I-864A:
The I-864 and I-864A must be submitted to a Consular Officer within one year of the date they are signed and notarized, or new forms will be required. A form accepted by a Consular Officer within one year of signature will have an unlimited validity and will not expire. However, a Consular Officer may require updating the supporting documents that are over one year old.

I-864A printing error: Part 1 of the I-864A may contain a printing error in the "relationship to sponsor" box. Please note that household members should complete Part 3. and sponsored immigrants/household members should complete Part 4. Detailed information regarding the sponsor's obligations under the new provisions, and instructions for completing the new Affidavit of Support are provided with the new Form I-864.


Domicile requirement

Domicile requirements for petitioners: All immigrant visa applicants are required by section 212(a)(4) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) to submit a notarized Affidavit of Support from their sponsor and to provide evidence that the petitioner has domicile in the United States. Domicile is defined in section 101(a)(33) of the INA as the place where a sponsor has a residence with the intention to maintain that residence for the foreseeable future. The petitioner must be domiciled in the United States or its territories in order to qualify as a sponsor. If the petitioner is not domiciled in the United States, a co-sponsor cannot be accepted and the applicant must be refused the visa pursuant to section 212(a)(4).

Domicile is a complex issue and must be determined on a case by case basis. As stated, a petitioner who is residing temporarily abroad must have a principal residence in the U.S. and intend to maintain that residence for the foreseeable future to qualify as a sponsor. Legal Permanent Resident sponsors must further demonstrate that they have maintained their legal permanent resident (LPR) status. A U.S. citizen or LPR spouse or dependent who has maintained a residence in the U.S. and/or whose spouse/parent works in one of the categories listed below, would also qualify as a sponsor. Many U.S. citizens and LPRs reside outside the United States on a temporary basis, usually for work or family considerations. Temporary is a relative term and may cover an extended period residing abroad. If the sponsor can establish, to the interviewing officer's satisfaction, that the sponsor left the U.S. for a limited and not indefinite period of time, intended to maintain a U.S. domicile, and has evidence of continued ties to the U.S., then the sponsor can be considered to be domiciled in the U.S. Note that the Department of Homeland Security regulations (Section 316(b), 317, or 319(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act) provide that sponsors who can show that they had a domicile in the United States, but who are now living temporarily abroad because of certain types of employment, shall be considered to have retained their domicile in the United States. A sponsor retains his/her domicile if the sponsor is:

There may be other circumstances in which a sponsor can show that his/her presence abroad is clearly of a temporary nature so that the sponsor can be considered to have a domicile in the United States. For example, persons who are abroad temporarily to study, teach, or engage in other activities that do not meet the requirements of Section 316(b), 317, or 319(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act may nevertheless be considered to have a domicile in the United States, if they can satisfy the interviewing consular officer that they did not, in fact, give up their domicile in the United States and establish a domicile abroad.

How to establish domicile?
If a petitioner travels to the United States and establishes a principal residence, where he/she intends to reside, he/she may then qualify as a sponsor. Establishing a principal residence would entail obtaining an address (a house, apartment, arrangements for accommodations with a family member or friend, etc.) and taking up physical residence. A convincing combination of the following could be considered as an indication of residence: establishing an address, setting up a bank account, transferring funds to the U.S., making investments, obtaining employment and paying income taxes, etc. Documents such as driver's licenses and bank accounts do not alone prove domicile. The interviewing officer must be convinced of the sponsor's domicile in the United States or the sponsor's imminent intent to return to the United States to reside. A U.S. citizen who has maintained a driver's license or bank account in the United States but has no intention to return to the United States (regardless of his family's immigrant visa applications) would not be considered domiciled in the United States.

Intent to be domiciled in the United States: If a sponsor intends to reside in the United States and makes that intention clear to the interviewing officer, the sponsor still needs to file an Affidavit of Support but can use a co-sponsor in order to address the question of public charge found in section 212(a)(4) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.


Fiancé/e Visa (K-1)

The Immigration and Nationality Act provides non-immigrant visa classification (K-1) for a person travelling to the United States with the express purpose of marrying a U.S. citizen. The marriage must occur within 90 days of his/her admission to the United States. Following the marriage, the alien spouse must apply to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to establish a record of entry for conditional permanent residence status. After two years, the alien may apply to the DHS for removal of the conditional status.

PETITION: To establish K-1 Visa classification for an intended alien spouse, a U.S. citizen must file a petition (Form I-129F) with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services Regional Center having jurisdiction over the petitioner's place of residence in the United States. Such petitions may not be adjudicated abroad. Both petitioner and beneficiary must be legally able and willing to conclude a valid marriage in the United States. The petitioner and beneficiary must have previously met in person within the past two years unless the Attorney General waives that requirement. The approved petition will be forwarded by DHS to the Consular Office where the alien fiancé(e) will apply for his/her visa. A petition is valid for a period of four months from the date of DHS action, and may be revalidated for several more months by the Consular Officer.

MINOR CHILDREN: The minor children of a K-1 beneficiary derive K-2 non-immigrant visa status from the parent as long as the children are named in the petition. A separate petition is not required if the children accompany or follow the alien fiancé(e) within one year from the date of issuance of the K-1 Visa. After one year, a separate immigrant visa petition is required.

DOCUMENTATION: Upon receipt of an approved petition from the DHS, the Consular Section will notify the beneficiary and send him/her the necessary forms and instructions to apply for a K-1 Visa. Since a fiancé(e) visa applicant is an intending immigrant, he/she must meet most of the same documentary requirements of an immigrant visa applicant. In addition to the prescribed application forms and photographs, the following documents are required:

  • Valid passport
  • Birth certificate and baptismal certificate
  • Divorce certificate(s), annulment(s), and/or death certificate(s) of any previous marriages of both the petitioner and the beneficiary
  • Police certificates from all places where the beneficiary has lived for six or more months since age 18
  • Evidence of valid relationship with the petitioner
  • Evidence of financial support
  • Medical examination by an Embassy panel physician
  • Colombian police certificate, valid for one year and countrywide, which may be requested at any DAS (Departamento Administrativo de Seguridad) office; and
  • Passports, birth certificates, and medical examinations for any accompanying children

Evidence of financial support comes from the petitioner. Usually, the petitioner completes the Form I-134 (a shorter version of the immigrant visa Affidavit of Support, Form I-864) and provides his/her last three years of income tax returns (Forms W-2 and 1040) and a job letter stating how long he/she has had his/her job and how much money he/she makes annually. Although fiancé(e) visa applicants face less stringent documentary requirements than immigrant visa application, the interviewing officer must have enough evidence of support to approve the visa.


VISA ISSUANCE: As soon as the processing of a case is completed and the applicant has informed the Consular Section that he/she has all the necessary documents, a packet will be sent with the necessary instructions, including a letter giving the appointment date. During the interview, a Consular Officer will determine the fiancé(e)'s eligibility for a K-1 Visa. If a visa is issued, it will be valid for one entry during a period of six months.

Based on the interview, if the consular officer issues the visa, your passport will be sent to your home seven to 10 working days after the interview by the courier service DOMESA. The applicant will receive an application for DOMESA which must be filled out and paid for at the DOMESA representatives' desk in the waiting room. If you do not pay DOMESA, you will not receive your visa. Immediately upon receipt, be sure to check your visa information to make sure it matches your personal data.

A $100.00 fee will be charged for each visa application. The fee must be paid at the Banco Union Colombiano prior to the interview with the Consular Officer.


V Visa

This new non-immigrant status is presently available to the spouses and minor children of legal permanent residents who are the beneficiaries of an F-2A Second Preference immigrant visa petition filed with the DHS. To be eligible, applicants must have been waiting more than three years for an immigrant visa, whether due to processing delays or unavailability of a visa number. The V Visa pertains only to those I-130 petitions filed on or before December 21, 2000.

Applicants who believe they qualify for this type of visa may come to the Embassy, Monday through Thursday at 1:00PM. The forms for the V Visa should be requested at the Immigrant Visa Unit and these three steps must be followed:

  1. Fill out Form OF-230, "Application for an Immigrant Visa and Alien Registration", Part I, Biographic Data and return it immediately to:

    Embajada de Estados Unidos de América
    Sección de Visas de Inmigrante
    Calle 22D-Bis # 47-51
    Bogotá, D.C.

  2. Collect the required documents as listed in Annex B and keep them for presentation at the formal interview.

    ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS: Present only original documents or notarized photocopies of the documents listed in Annex B.

    There is no need to present translations of documents written in English or Spanish. Documents written in other languages must be translated into English by an official translator, certified and sworn by the translator before a notary public.

  3. After the applicant has informed the Embassy that he/she has collected all the listed documents, a date for the formal interview will be assigned, as soon as possible. The applicant must wait to be notified of this date, without calling nor writing to the Consular Section, except to report an address change or a change in the family status, such as a marriage, a birth, or the death of the petitioner.

  4. A $100.00 fee will be charged for each visa application. The fee must be paid at the Banco Union Colombiano prior to the interview with the Consular Officer.



Presenting false or forged documents can make you permanently ineligible for a visa.



Fees



The Consular Section does not accept $100.00 bills,
checks nor debit cards.
It accepts major credit cards:
MasterCard, Visa, Discover, Diner's Club, American Express.

FILING A PETITION FOR YOUR IMMEDIATE RELATIVE

If you are a citizen of the United States you may file a petition for your spouse, child or step-child (Form I-130) at the Immigrant Visa Unit of the Consular Section only if you are a legal resident of Colombia and have currently completed at least six months continuous presence in the country. This may be done at 1:00PM Monday through Thursday, except on U.S. and/or Colombian holidays. The fee for filing a petition (Form I-130) is $185.00 or its equivalent in Colombian pesos.


IMMIGRANT VISA

The formal application for an immigrant visa has a fee of $335.00 or its equivalent in Colombian pesos. On the day of the interview, the applicant will be charged a total of $335.00.


LABORATORY AND MEDICAL EXAMINATION FEES

The total cost of the laboratory tests and medical examination that are required for visa issuance is Col$195,000 pesos (Col$90,000 for the physical examination and Col$105,000 for the serology and HIV blood test and the X-ray). These fees are paid directly to the doctors, not to the Embassy.


BABY LETTERS

A United States Legal Permanent Resident who travels to Colombia to have her baby, may take the baby to the United States with a transportation letter, provided it is within one year of the birth of the child and the mother is returning to the United States for the first time since the birth. To obtain the transportation letter for the baby, the mother should come to the Immigrant Visa (IV) Unit any day, Monday through Thursday, at 1:00PM. The Legal Permanent Resident mother must bring the baby to the Embassy as well as her passport and the baby's passport. She is also required to present the child's birth certificate along with a hospital certificate, copies of the bills paid to the hospital, and the medical certificate from the obstetrician stating that he/she was the doctor present at the child's birth. In addition, a report from DAS (Departamento Administrativo de Seguridad) indicating travel history is also required. The resident mother must complete a form requesting the issuance of a transportation letter for the child. This form has a fee of $300.00 or its equivalent in Colombian pesos.


TRANSPORTATION LETTER

The transportation letter that is requested by a legal permanent resident of the United States who has lost, has had stolen, or has not received his/her resident card, has a fee of $300.00 or its equivalent in Colombian pesos. The $300.00 must be paid when you request the transportation letter; if the letter is not approved, the $300.00 will not be reimbursed.


RETURNING RESIDENTS

When a Legal Permanent Resident has remained outside the United States for over one year, he/she has lost his/her resident status. If he/she had the intention of returning to the United States, never abandoned that intention, and was unable to return to the United States due to circumstances beyond his/her control, the individual may apply for a returning resident (SB-1) visa. He/she must pay $360.00 or its equivalent in Colombian pesos for the returning resident application. The visa interview fee is $335.00 or the equivalent in Colombian pesos. If the Consular Officer who studies his/her case determines that he/she is not eligible to obtain a returning resident visa, the $360.00 or its equivalent in pesos will not be reimbursed.





If you present false documents you will be violating Colombian and U.S.laws. An applicant who presents false documents may be found permanently ineligible to enter the U.S.


Service to the public for general information, or for the filing of a petition by U.S. citizens resident in Colombia for their spouses and minor children or step-children, is at exactly 1:00PM, Monday through Thursday except on U.S. holidays and/or Colombian holidays.


Applications for immigrant visas are received at exactly 7:00AM, Monday through Thursday except on U.S. and/or Colombian holidays.

The appointment confirmation letter must be presented.

No applicant arriving after 8:00AM will be allowed to enter for an interview.


ADOPTIONS

Only U.S. citizens may take an adopted child to the U.S. with an immigrant visa.

Legal Permanent Residents may not file petitions for their adopted children;
at least one of the adopting parents must be a U.S. citizen.

Additional information on adoptions

Child Citizenship Act of 2000


For visas for Colombian children adopted by citizens of countries other than the U.S., please contact the Non-Immigrant Visa unit at (571) 315-1566 extension 2740 or 2485.


For more information regarding Immigrant Visa issues
call (571) 315-1566
between 3:00PM and 4:00PM only on Tuesdays

or send an e-mail:
IVBogota@state.gov