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FDA Logo U.S. Food and Drug AdministrationCenter for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
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Dietary Supplements
 
Contents

** Overview · Recent Announcements
· FDA-DSFL Electronic Newsletter

** Warnings and Safety Information · Recent Alerts
· Additional Safety Information
· Reporting Problems

** Adverse Event Reporting · Report a Problem or Illness Associated With a Dietary Supplement
· CFSAN Adverse Event Reporting System

** Announcements & Meetings · Announcements, Reports and Plans
· Public Meetings
· Presentations and Statements
· Advisory Committee Meetings

** Consumer Education & General Information · About Dietary Supplements
· Links to Related FDA Information
· Tips for the Savvy Supplement User (English/Spanish)

** Industry Information
Labeling Regs · Proposed and Final Regulations
· General Industry Information
· Correspondence Related to Policy
· SN/AEMS
· CODEX

** Label Claims · Significant Scientific Agreement
· Qualified Health Claims
· FDAMA Health & Nutrient Content Claims
· Nutrient Content Claims
· Structure/Function Claims

** Questions & Answers · Frequently Asked Questions

** Other Sources of Information · Other Federal Government Agencies
· Non Federal Government Sources

Overview

Overview
About the Office of Nutritional Products, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements
FDA-DSFL Electronic Newsletter   |   Recent Announcements   |   Frequently Requested Information

FDA regulates dietary supplements under a different set of regulations than those covering "conventional" foods and drug products (prescription and Over-the-Counter). Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA), the dietary supplement manufacturer is responsible for ensuring that a dietary supplement is safe before it is marketed. FDA is responsible for taking action against any unsafe dietary supplement product after it reaches the market. Generally, manufacturers do not need to register with FDA nor get FDA approval before producing or selling dietary supplements. Manufacturers must make sure that product label information is truthful and not misleading.

FDA's post-marketing responsibilities include monitoring safety, e.g. voluntary dietary supplement adverse event reporting, and product information, such as labeling, claims, package inserts, and accompanying literature. The Federal Trade Commission regulates dietary supplement advertising.

About the Office of Nutritional Products, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements

FDA-DSFL Electronic Newsletter

Recent Announcements

Frequently Requested Information

 

 
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