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Tuesday November 02, 2004   
USINFO >  Publications

Executive Editor
George Clack

Managing Editor
Kathleen Hug

Contributing Editors
Rick Marshall,
David Pitts

Art Director
Thaddeus A. Miksinski, Jr.

Picture Editor
Rosalie Targonski

Contributors
Robert Holden,
Hugh Howard,
Andrew Lluberes,
Lydia Voronina,
Professor Theodore Orlin (Utica College of Syracuse University)

Internet Editors
Suzanne Dawkins,
Wayne Hall

Introduction to Human Rights
Français | Farsi

(Posted April 2001)

WHAT ARE HUMAN RIGHTS?
In the last decade the demand for human rights has become a revolutionary force in the world. In this essay, scholar Jack Donnelly traces the development of human rights from their origins as a political theory in 17th-century Europe to their present-day acceptance as an international standard.

THE U.S. COMMITMENT: HUMAN RIGHTS AND FOREIGN POLICY
In a moving speech given in 1978, then President Jimmy Carter highlighted the importance of human rights to the United States and its people as the country fulfills its international obligations. His words ring true today.

"WE HOLD THESE TRUTHS TO BE SELF-EVIDENT...."
The United States is a nation founded on the principle of individual rights, and yet Americans' notions of rights continue to expand even today. This essay on American history highlights the obstacles that were overcome and the laws and leaders that have pushed the concept forward.

ELEVEN WHO MADE A DIFFERENCE
In this century, heroic individuals have shown time and again that eloquent courage can shake repressive regimes and alter the course of history. Here, in their own words, are the ideas of 11 great advocates of human rights.

THE DEAD HAVE NOTHING TO LOSE BY TELLING THE TRUTH
A poem by Marvin Bell, the Flannery O'Connor Professor of Letters at the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop, commemorating the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

TIMELINE: HUMAN RIGHTS IN AMERICA

FURTHER READINGS ON HUMAN RIGHTS


THE HELSINKI PROCESS

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH

WAR CRIMES TRIBUNALS

THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

THE BILL OF RIGHTS

THE FOUR FREEDOMS

RETURN TO DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS HOMEPAGE
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